bengal-cat

I say this with a little bit of cynicism, but I suppose it was inevitable that I would be publishing a top tenner (or in this case, much smaller) list of sorts. It seems to be the in thing to do on the internet these days. Simply put together a top one hundred list of anything imaginable you can think of, juggle a few keywords together here and there, copy and paste some information, and type as creatively as possible, and there you go, press the publish button, and a few days later, pay day.

The quickest way to make money. Not quite. And not even close. What I do appreciate about some of these lists is that there’s an overriding amount of enthusiasm on the part of the writer when putting together the lists. He or she seems to have taken a keen interest in reptiles, or exotic pets, as in the context of my blog, for instance. What I enjoy most about these lists is that none of them are exactly the same. There will be similarities here and there for good reason, but that’s about it really. Another thing I like about these lists is some of the unique features and subjects featured.

My list is necessarily short. It is also a representation of my favourite pets and why I believe it might be feasible to keep them (or not). Unfortunately, I cannot write from the point of view of authority because my interest in these creatures has not been extended beyond my own reading and observations of these animals out in the wild or at conservatories where they are being cared for and nursed back to health after being kept under inhumane circumstances, abused and harmed. The list is random. I urge you to take more time out to make further studies of these amazing creatures.

KINKAJOU

kinkajou

This little animal is for the night owls. It is a nocturnal creature that enjoys lengthy conversations with its companions (not owners, I don’t like to use that word, and I consider all creatures a part of one big, happy family, well, that’s what I’d like to believe anyway). Feeding this chap is no trouble at all. You can prepare for it a healthy diet of bananas, mangoes and eggs. If you need close companionship then the kinkajou might be ideal because it is a soft-hearted and caring animal by nature.

BENGAL CAT

Only those truly worthy and with a full appreciation of feline species, perhaps even knowledgeable and qualified handlers should have this precious Bengal cat in their home. It is no relation to the much larger Bengal tiger, of course, but I often wonder how it would cope in controlled, domestic environments and with neighbourhood cats and dogs prowling about. That would have to be some bugbear to take into account, wouldn’t it? Unfortunately, this creature has been cross-bred to become the exotic creature that it’s portrayed to be today.

TWO-TOED SLOTH

What I like about the creature the most is that it is so darn slow. It’s not a small creature, by any means, but controlling it in a domestic environment, out in the garden even, could be perceived to be easy in layman’s terms. If you’re going to be a model keeper of this rare creature, you’ll need to do as much as you can to create the perfect outdoor environment for the sloth. There must be a lot of foliage and you’ll ideally have a large plot with plenty of place to keep trees. Otherwise, if it’s going to be kept in an aviary, the same criteria apply in regard to recreating a natural environment for this quiet, slow creature.

BALL PYTHON

This is for those who love snakes, like I do. But it really will be a tough ask to keep a five feet long python in your home, that is, if you have the space for it. Not minding its size, you’re still going to need to provide it with a huge tank filled to the brim with at least thousands of litres of water. Then you’re going to need to feed it incessantly on newly dead small creatures, seeing as the python can’t go out and fetch its own food. You need to have patience and tolerance, and you’ll need to be able to ensure that your health is in check so that you can outlive this large reptilian creature.

GENET

genet

This is a small creature for exotic animal lovers who also love being kept on their toes. This cat-like creature is a real live-wire. An interesting feature of the genet is that it combines a number of qualities of other animals into its own. I like the fact that this animal is always going to take fierce pride in its own independence, even if it is able to settle down in a domestic environment. You might need to be prepared for a little chaos. Apart from not being a pet for laps, never mind a pet at all, the genet is not one of those animals that you can discipline and train. It is not animal that enjoys being restrained by humans.

You know, the list is so long, one could easily add dozens more animals to it, but my short list was composed deliberately. Interested readers will always be looking elsewhere for other exotic animal species. All I’ve done is added my two cents worth. If I could add my five dollars’ worth, then maybe this last word or two will add impetus to my own, original thoughts. Rodents in general are unfairly disliked and every effort is made to exterminate them. I’d like to see some species preserved and perhaps the only way this can happen is if we learn to take care of them, safe from hunters.

Insects and arachnids, did you know, are also listed elsewhere as exotic pets. And my favourites here? Ants and scorpions.

Written by reppy

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